Poets, Prophets and Disciples:
What it Means to Follow Jesus
Lenten Daily Devotional
March 19, 2019
 
 
 
 


The Breastplate of Saint Patrick


The virtue of the love of seraphim,

In the obedience of angels,

In the hope of resurrection unto reward,

In prayers of Patriarchs,

In predictions of Prophets,

In preaching of Apostles,

In faith of Confessors,

In purity of holy Virgins,

In deeds of righteous men.

I bind to myself today


Tuesday March 19
Vision to See Through


Luke 19:11-27

As they were listening to this, he went on to tell a parable, because he was near Jerusalem, and because they supposed that the kingdom of God was to appear immediately. So he said, ‘A nobleman went to a distant country to get royal power for himself and then return. He summoned ten of his slaves, and gave them ten pounds, and said to them, “Do business with these until I come back.” But the citizens of his country hated him and sent a delegation after him, saying, “We do not want this man to rule over us.” When he returned, having received royal power, he ordered these slaves, to whom he had given the money, to be summoned so that he might find out what they had gained by trading. The first came forward and said, “Lord, your pound has made ten more pounds.” He said to him, “Well done, good slave! Because you have been trustworthy in a very small thing, take charge of ten cities.” Then the second came, saying, “Lord, your pound has made five pounds.” He said to him, “And you, rule over five cities.” Then the other came, saying, “Lord, here is your pound. I wrapped it up in a piece of cloth, for I was afraid of you, because you are a harsh man; you take what you did not deposit, and reap what you did not sow.” He said to him, “I will judge you by your own words, you wicked slave! You knew, did you, that I was a harsh man, taking what I did not deposit and reaping what I did not sow? Why then did you not put my money into the bank? Then when I returned, I could have collected it with interest.” He said to the bystanders, “Take the pound from him and give it to the one who has ten pounds.” (And they said to him, “Lord, he has ten pounds!”) “I tell you, to all those who have, more will be given; but from those who have nothing, even what they have will be taken away. But as for these enemies of mine who did not want me to be king over them—bring them here and slaughter them in my presence.” ’


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This parable does not show up in our lectionary and can be difficult to wrap our heads around.  Here is a section of commentary from Luther Seminary’s Enter the Bible Project.  To read the entire commentary go to https://www.enterthebible.org/resourcelink.aspx?rid=155.


Instead, the nobleman is probably a negative character, meant to illustrate the ways in which people consolidate their power, seek outrageous profits, and eliminate their opposition. In light of what will happen to Jesus after he enters Jerusalem as a king in the following scene, the parable's nobleman and his kingdom provide a foil to Jesus and his kingdom. The parable, in light of the immediate context (v. 11) and Jesus' imminent entry into Jerusalem, reminds audiences that God's reign will unfold in a very different way than the reigns of human rulers who rule through force and intimidation. The parable contrasts Jesus' authority with that of human authorities.​​​​​​​

 
 
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