NOVEMBER 21, 2019
 
 
 
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In house attorneys looking for a better way to organize, vet and easily retrieve legal news created the National Law Review on-line edition.

Around the clock, the National Law Review's editors screen and classify breaking news and analysis authored by recognized legal professionals and our own journalists.

There is no log in to access the database and new articles are added hourly.
 
 
 
 
 
The NBA commenced its new season on 22 October with the battle for Los Angeles, as Kawhi’s Clippers edged the Lakers this time. But, less than three weeks into the new season, attention has turned to off-the-court matters; three NBA players who were active on rosters last season have been suspended for testing positive for banned substances.  Wilson Chandler of the Brooklyn Nets tested positive for Ipamorelin, a growth hormone during the summer. The number 1 pick of last year’s draft, DeAndre Ayton tested positive for a diuretic whilst the Atlanta Hawks’ John Collins tested positive for Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-2, a synthetic drug found to increase appetite and food intake.   More on NBA Players Suspended for Drug Violations Here>
 
 
 
 
 
The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals recently ruled that the American with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) does not protect an applicant who later may become impaired. In this instance, a worker applied for a position that would have required him to perform “safety-sensitive” tasks. After he was extended a conditional offer of employment, Plaintiff was required to pass a medical evaluation. Defendant, as a matter of course, does not hire applicants for safety-sensitive position if their body mass index (“BMI”) is over 40. Defendant reasoned that applicants who exceed BMI levels are at a substantially higher risk of developing certain conditions that can result in incapacitation on the job. Plaintiff’s BMI was 47.5.  More on ADA and Future Disabilities Here>
 
 
 
 
 
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As we previously reported, Nevada has enacted a personal leave law, which, effective January 1, 2020, will require private employers with 50 or more employees in Nevada to provide certain employees working in the state with up to 40 hours of paid leave per year, to be used for any purpose, including non-medical personal reasons. To that end, the Nevada Labor Commissioner issued two advisory opinions regarding the new law.  More on Nevada Labor Commission on Paid Personal Leave Here >
 
 
 
 
 
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit issued an important ruling in the Equal Pay Act class action against Sterling Jewelers.  The class action case alleges that Sterling Jewelers had a glass ceiling for female retail sales employees under which women were paid less and were not promoted as often as similarly situated male employees. The appellate court reversed the trial court on a key issue that could expand the size of the potential class action considerably.  More on Equal Pay Class Action Settlement Here >
 
 
 
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