NCSEJ Moderates UN 75th Anniversary Commemoration of Babi Yar Massacres
 
 
 
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                               
CONTACT
Mark B. Levin
202-898-2500
MLevin@ncsej.org

WASHINGTON, DC October 14, 2016 - On Thursday evening, NCSEJ Executive Vice-Chairman and CEO Mark B. Levin moderated an evening of commemoration at the United Nations in New York City to remember the massacres at Babi Yar seventy-five years ago.

Hundreds of government and civic leaders attended the event, sponsored by the Permanent Missions to the United Nations of Ukraine, Israel, and the United States.

Mr. Levin moderated a program that included UN Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights Ivan Šimonović, and Permanent Representatives to the UN Ambassadors Danny Danon (Israel), Samantha Power (United States), and Volodymyr Yelchenko (Ukraine).

The event began with a video speech by President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko. The four speakers presented remarks, and Mr. Levin read the poem "Each One Of Us Has A Name."

The program also included video testimony by Raisa Dashekevich, a survivor of the Babi Yar massacre, a recitation of victim names by the ambassadors, and a musical performance by the New York Virtuoso Orchestra.

A full video of the program is available at http://webtv.un.org/meetings-events/.

In two days in September 1941, over 33,000 people, mainly Jews, were killed by Nazi forces at Babi Yar. From 1941 to 1943, between 50,000 and 100,000 people were killed at the site, including others.

For further comment, please contact NCSEJ Executive Vice-Chairman and CEO Mark B. Levin at MLevin@ncsej.org or at (202) 898-2500.

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(l-r) Israeli Amb. Danon, Ukrainian Amb. Yelchenko, NCSEJ CEO Levin, and U.S. Amb. Power at the commemoration (webtv.un.org)
 
 
 
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About NCSEJ
Founded in 1971, NCSEJ represents the organized American Jewish community in monitoring and advocating on behalf of the estimated 1.5 million Jews in Eastern Europe and Eurasia, including the 15 successor states of the former Soviet Union.
 
 
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