NCSEJ Calls on Lviv Local Officials to Cancel Festival in Honor of Roman Shukhevych
 
 
 
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
                                   
CONTACT
Mark B. Levin
202-898-2500


 

WASHINGTON, DC - June 29, 2017 – NCSEJ denounces and calls on local authorities in Lviv to cancel a festival in honor of Roman Shukhevych. This event is an insult to the memories of those who were killed during the Holocaust.


Roman Shukhevych was a general in the Ukraine Insurgent Army (UPA) and Nachtigall Battalion, which collaborated with Nazi troops.

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The festival, scheduled for June 30-July 2, 2017, is being held to mark the 110th anniversary of Shukhevych's birth and coincides with the 76th anniversary of 1941 anti-Jewish pogroms in Lviv. Ukrainian nationalists from the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA) and the Nachtigall Battalion willingly participated in the pogroms in which as many as 4000 Jews were killed in early July alone.


The festival is being organized by the Department of Culture of the Lviv City Administration and Bilohorshcha Cultural Center and includes sporting activities, film screenings, lectures, and musical performances. An event is also planned for Kyiv on June 30 and is co-sponsored by far-right political parties Svoboda and Praviy Sektor, two groups that routinely espouse extremist and xenophobic views.


The festival comes just weeks after the Kyiv city administration voted to rename General Vatutin Boulevard in Kyiv in honor of Shukhevych.


NCSEJ urges local authorities to cancel this event and for all Ukrainian leaders to speak out against undeserved glorification of Shukhevych, a direct participant in the genocide of Ukraine’s Jews.


For further comment, please contact NCSEJ CEO Mark B. Levin at MLevin@ncsej.org or at (202) 898-2500.

 
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About NCSEJ
Founded in 1971, NCSEJ represents the organized American Jewish community in monitoring and advocating on behalf of the estimated 1.5 million Jews in Eastern Europe and Eurasia, including the 15 successor states of the former Soviet Union.
 
 
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